Even More Cookie Time: Triple Ginger

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Sometimes you need to pose with a Poinsettia. (But careful, aren’t they slightly poisonous?) 

December doesn’t exist in my head until some kind of ginger spice cookie is ready for eating.

Last year I baked this recipe for Molasses Krinkles, which was enjoyable, but it didn’t seem to be the cookie I loved from previous years. I think I’ve finally located the version that I love. The difference? Lots and lots of ginger: the dough contains chopped crystallized ginger, minced fresh ginger, and a healthy dose of ground ginger to top it off. Just my style. I would even consider measuring out heaping teaspoonfuls (or 1/2 teaspoonfuls) of the spices listed, if you want an extra kick.  This cookie is pure heaven warm from the oven. It also stays softly chewy for a few days, especially if you only keep it in the oven no longer than the suggested 15 minutes.

One caveat: the previous Molasses Krinkle recipe that I made did have a nice texture thanks to the shortening. Maybe I need to combine the best of both worlds and adapt the recipe? Next year it is!

Recipe Credit: Epicurious

Kitchen Mess: 2 out of 4 stars.

Recommended For: Cookie Lovers and Their Friends

Not Recommended For: ?

Cookie Time Continues! Multigrain Chocolate Chip

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Helloooo buckwheat flour. Not everyone’s cup of tea but it works for me once in a while. Yes, the items shown in the image above are cookies- promise. Sugary ones, too. These will make sense when you want a cookie but feel really, really bad about it. I’m a complete sucker for anything that tries to infuse healthy elements into not-so-healthy foods. (ex: grated carrots in canned tomato soup, a scoop of barley flour in buttermilk pancakes) Does it work? Eh, probably not. Although maybe it’s better than snacking on wonder bread and processed cheese sandwiches on a daily basis?  I say yes to that.

Despite having a solid dose of whole grain (whole wheat flour, buckwheat flour, and kasha), these do have a normal amount of sugar. They have sugar, salt, and butter galore. No sense in making them pretend-health-food-cookies, right?

At first I thought the flavor was a little too hearty, but I grew to love them after the second cookie. (one must always try a new cookie twice, just to be sure.) Definitely make sure to sprinkle a little flaky sea salt on these babies- the added salt infusion really goes with the whole flavor.

Another tip would be to let the dough refrigerate for a day or so. I baked two batches: one the day of, another one 36 hours later. I thought the second batch mellowed out the crunchy kasha more to my liking.

Recipe Credit: Design Sponge (note that I used a newer Dorie Greenspan alteration, not on the internet, that has a few adjustments: 1. Reduce the amount of light brown sugar to 2/3 cup and 2. replace the 1/4 cup of cracked rye with a 1/4 cup of Kasha (buckwheat groats). She recommends Wolff’s medium granulation. Another substitute would be 1/4 cup of finely chopped toasted nuts.)

Kitchen Mess: 2 out of 4. A typical cookie mess.

Recommended For: Anyone Who Thinks Adding Whole Wheat Flour To Anything Makes It Healthy, Adventurous Types, Sweet and Salty Fans

Not Recommended For: Whole Grain Haters, Picky Eaters, Purists

 

Moroccan Almond Semolina Cookie Time!

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Dorie Greenspan’s new cookie book looks perfect. Everything I’ve tried so far from various magazine/internet articles has been a winner, so I think it’s time for me to go buy a physical copy. This Moroccan Almond Semolina cookie was the first recipe on my list. In my opinion, semolina desserts are the best. (but so are almond flavored sweets….and lemony scented dessert….and also anything with a splash of orange flower water….so here you have it, a cookie that combines all of these elements!)

If you’re not one for the specific texture of semolina, I’d definitely move on to another cookie. No sense in messing with that crucial element here. However, one item that can be omitted is the orange flower water. If you’d like you can try adding an equal amount of rose water instead, or perhaps a little extra lemon zest. It also says nothing at all is fine too. I’d really suggest trying it out first- it adds a lovely floral hint to the cookie.

This recipe seems to be both very specific and versatile all at once. What is specific is the flavor and texture. The versatility comes in when and where it can be used: I can see this working as part of a whole holiday cookie platter, as a teatime snack, or at a springtime or Easter brunch. Play around and see what makes the most sense!

Recipe Credit: Dorie Greenspan via NY Times

Kitchen Mess: 2 out of 4 stars. Not bad considering it involves a little powdered sugar

Recommended For: A Different Kind of Cookie Platter, Holiday Parties for Adults, Days When You Want To Bake Cookies But You Only Have Canola Oil, Not Butter

Not Recommended For: Kids Parties, People Who Dislike Orange Flower Water